Tag Archive: Arduino


As I mentioned in a previous post, I have written code to read a ProxPoint Plus 6800 RFID Reader (Clock & Data output model) from HID. This is going to be a very long post, so click through to read it all.

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**UPDATE: Lauszus has updated the library to work with the Panasonic and JVC Protocols. See the link to his version in the comments below. Big thanks to him for sharing 🙂

Here is the Arduino IR library with working Panasonic protocol support that people have been asking about. I have also included a very basic sketch that will send the “Power” code to turn the TV on/off. Please be VERY AWARE that this is the OLD Panasonic protocol that has been implemented. That’s the reason the video uses my crappy 20″ TV instead of my new bigscreen. I may decide to implement the new protocol one day, but I just have too much on the go right now to pull it off. Enjoy!

I’m just posting this since the post about my Arduino + MAX-7456 board still seems to be getting a fair bit of attention. I gathered up the code linked to in my original blog post and have uploaded a .zip with the library files as well as a test sketch that uses it. I haven’t taken a close look at this code in a long time, and I never did get around to fixing it like I wanted to. Since I’ve abandoned the Arduino in favor of the Rabbit for my access system solution it became apparent that this wasn’t something I was going to pursue anymore, but I figured I’d release what I did mash together for what it’s worth. It’s a pretty sloppy implementation as I just wanted to test proof-of-concept code to get it working quickly. It works by passing a massive array to a function (1 element for each character location available w/ the MAX-7456, don’t recall what that is right now). I had originally intended to modify the code so that it could work with the string library, keep track of it’s current position and allow a “MoveToLocation(int x)” type procedure to clean stuff up, so feel free to go ahead and do that and share it with everybody 😀

NOTE: Those of you interested in PAL: Go to my original blog post (link above) and look at the code linked. You will see a crapload of DEFINE blocks that are enclosed in comments. One set of comments contains a set of variables used for PAL, the other for NTSC. IIRC you can simply swap the values for PAL to replace the NTSC values in the library and it should work just fine. I think a few little things change, like # of chars that will fit on the screen, so you might have to play with that a bit, but it should be pretty straightforward.

Cheers!

Chameleon Invasion

So I’ve been on quite the shopping rampage lately ordering some parts, several books and I just now ordered a few new dev. kits that I can’t wait to play with! As I was reading my new issue of Circuit Cellar I saw an article about a development board that contains an Atmel AVR 328P *AND* a Parallax Propeller. I’ve been wanting to play with the propeller for quite some time now, but just never got around to ordering one. The board is from Nurve Networks and it is called the Chameleon.

I should also note that it also comes with a PIC in place of the AVR, but the fact that the AVR comes pre-loaded with the Arduino bootloader and that there are already Arduino libraries for the platform looks really interesting! I have ordered two boards and I think I’m going to try an experiment to create the same project on both boards, one using the Arduino bootloader/IDE/libraries and one without to post a comparison of the time required to complete each.

Some of the board’s features include:

  • 2 Processors for a total of 9 processing cores
  • 1MB Flash, 64K EEPROM
  • NTSC/PAL video output as well as VGA interface
  • Audio out
  • PS2 port for interfacing with keyboard/mouse

Take into account that the entire package is currently going for less than $60 and it looks even more impressive. As always, I’ll post on any projects/experiences once I get them in 😀

Cheers!

I have finally gotten around to re-writing some of my old code and re-recording a proper demo of controlling physical objects using thoughts by interfacing an EEG headset with an Arduino. While this technology is interesting and exciting, before anyone sees this as an endorsement for this particular EEG headset, I strongly recommend reading my full review of the device below. Those of you who have no interest in purchasing such a device can simply enjoy the show :D.

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As an update to my previous post, my IR setup is tested and working just fine. The library from Ken Shirriff’s blog worked great. I had to do some tweaking to get the Panasonic protocol working which took a bit of time because I had to go through all of the code to debug and find the problems, but it certainly paid off in the end. Range is currently limited (~10ft.) but I’m going to be adding a transistor to my final design so that I can boost output to the IR LED. Next step is to hook it up to my EEG so that I can turn my TV on/off by thought alone. Stay tuned, I should have a video of it ready any day now 😀

Cheers!

I have been having some timing issues with my Panasonic IR protocol library that I’ve been working on, so I decided to put the project on hold while I awaited the delivery of my new USBEE logic analyzer. When I initially ordered the device I must have had a brain-fart because I neglected to change UPS from the default shipper. When it arrived yesterday I was blown away to find that on top of the $20 delivery charge they wanted $59 for duties on a $130 item. That’s right… $79 to ship a $130 item that fits into a small envelope. I’ll admit that my jaw almost hit the ground, but I’ll guarantee that it wasn’t 1/2 as funny as the driver’s face when I told him I wasn’t paying it and that I refused delivery. I have known for a very long time that UPS charges insane brokerage rates for cross-border items and am usually very careful not to order anything shipped by them. I was fully expecting to pay ~$30 or so over and above the $20 in shipping, but this was just too much.

The upshot of all of this is that I saved over $130 because instead of re-ordering I decided to do more searching for arduino IR libraries and, thankfully, found one on Ken Shirriff’s blog here. The Panasonic protocol isn’t included in the library, but luckily a user posted code for it in the comments below. I have yet to actually test this out, but I’m hopeful that it will go well. In the meantime I’ve decided to wait until the Client Software for the Open Bench Logic Sniffer has some protocol decoders completed to order one of those (sorry USBEE).

I hope to post an update on my progress (hopefully I will have a fully working unit :D) shortly.

Cheers!

Well, it has been a crazy couple of weeks. A few hours after my last post I noticed that one of my guitars had cracked so I had to deal with that and take it in to a luthier (thanks Fred!) and I have had a relative in the hospital for the last week so things have been absolutely insane. Luckily things are starting to normalize and, as promised in my previous post here, I am including a quick video of my Nintendo DS Touchscreen prototype using an Arduino. Unfortunately the first few seconds of the video got wiped out, but all of the important bits are in there so I couldn’t be bothered to re-encode it :D.

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DS Touch Screen Project

So my SparkFun order came in today. I received some IR LEDs, some IR ICs w/ EEPROM that can record IR signals from any remote, store them and then perform an action when they are detected again (by controlling digital output pins). I also got some Nintendo DS touchscreens and breakout boards for them and a few other little toys.

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An Arduino Apology

I’ll admit it… I trash talked the Arduino platform. I’ll also admit that any comments I made were entirely unfounded. Like other people I know, I equated the Arduino platform’s simplicity with “restrictiveness” and “cheesyness.” I don’t know why, but I kind of viewed it as the “VB” of microcontroller programming (ie: good for n00bs, but really bad otherwise). I used to laugh at people who had their little toolboxes with their cute cut-to-length wires and kits.

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